Entries by Jacqui

Keynote Talk on Demedicalising Distress in Powys, September 2013

Watch my recent talk on Demedicalising Distress in Powys on YouTube. http://youtu.be/JHzHliy5yeQ The Powys Mental Health team invites you to a free conference they are organising in in Llandrindod Wells. Shaping Services Together. Should the question underpinning how we shape our mental health services be “what has happened to you” rather than “what is wrong […]

Treatment Gap: The Truth about Mental Health

If you have a mental health problem, where you live in the world makes a big  difference to the care you receive. In many lower and middle income countries,  three-quarters of people with mental health problems don’t have access to  mainstream mental health services. Even in wealthier, developed countries, the figure is close to 50%. […]

Editorial: Voices in a Positive Light

    What does it mean to think of voices ‘in a positive light’?   For the contributors to this first special issue of Psychosis, it means challenging any model that understands voice-hearing solely as the meaning-less symptom of an underlying disease, deficit, or dysfunction. Mainstream biomedical psychiatry’s account of auditory verbal hallucinations we regard […]

Hearing Voices Peer Support Groups: A Powerful Alternative for People in Distress

ABSTRACT: Hearing voices peer support groups offer a powerful alternative to mainstream psychiatric approaches for understanding and coping with states typically diagnosed as “hallucination”.  In this jointly authored first-person account, we distill what we have learned from 10 years of facilitating and training others to facilitate these groups and what enables them to work most […]

Just Saying It As It Is: Names matter; Language Matters; Truth Matters

Clinical language has colonised experiences of mental distress and alienation. Consequently, many accounts of healing and recovery seem to be about a decolonising process, a reclaiming of experience (Dillon and May, 2002). These counter narratives, which offer diverse representations of survival in adversity (hooks, 1993), follow in a long tradition of protest literature (Hornstein, 2002). […]

Just Saying It As It Is: Names matter; Language Matters; Truth Matters

    Clinical language has colonised experiences of mental distress and alienation. Consequently, many accounts of healing and recovery seem to be about a decolonising process, a reclaiming of experience (Dillon and May, 2002). These counter narratives, which offer diverse representations of survival in adversity (hooks, 1993), follow in a long tradition of protest literature […]