Posts

Trauma & Dissociation Journal

Hearing voices, dissociation, and the self: A functional-analytic perspective

Abstract

In the current article, we review existing models of the etiology of voice hearing. We summarize the argument and evidence that voice hearing is primarily a dissociative process involving critical aspects of self. We propose a complementary perspective on these phenomena that is based on a modern behavioral account of complex behavior known as relational frame theory. This type of approach to voice hearing concerns itself with the functions served for the individual by this voice hearing; the necessary history, such as trauma, that establishes these functions; and the relevant dissociative processes involving self and others. In short, we propose a trauma–dissociation developmental trajectory in which trauma impacts negatively on the development of self through the process of dissociation. Using the relational frame theory concept of relations of perspective taking, our dissociation model purports that trauma gives rise to more coordination than distinction relations between self and others, thus weakening an individual’s sense of a distinct self. Voice hearing experiences, therefore, reflect an individual’s perceptions of self and others and may indicate impairments in the natural psychological boundaries between these critical related concepts. One clinical implication suggested by this model is that therapeutic intervention should understand the behaviors associated with a sense of self that is fragile and threatened by others. Relations with self and others should be a key focus of therapy as well as interventions designed to enhance a coherent distinct sense of self.

Authors: C. McEnteggart , Y.Barnes-Holmes, J. Dillon, J. Egger & J.Oliver

Published in: Journal of Trauma and Dissociation

Publisher: Taylor and Francis

Date: 8th January 2016

Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15299732.2016.1241851?journalCode=wjtd20

Trauma, Dissociation, Attachment & Neuroscience: A new paradigm for understanding severe mental distress

Special Edition: Complex reactions to severe trauma

The paper by Dillon, Johnstone & Longden in this volume (Trauma, Dissociation, Attachment and Neuroscience) brings together evidence from the neuroscience and mental health literature with the hope that this might lead to a paradigm shift in the way that people are seen and helped. Hopefully they are right, and biopsychosocial models worthy of the name may come to dominate practice, rather than models that sometimes masquerade as biopsychosocial but which are basically ‘bio-bio-bio models’, with social and psychological factors reduced to mere events that trigger an underlying genetic illness (Read, Bentall & Fosse, 2009).

JCPCP is a peer-reviewed journal which values personal experience above professional boundaries and doctrinal jargon. It provides a forum for ideas, experience and views of people working in the psychological world and those who use psychotherapy or receive psychiatric services. The journal encourages a critical, reflexive view of psychology and counselling and is a constant challenge to orthodoxy. Our contributors reflect on their work and experiences in therapy, in relationships and in institutions. The journal embraces philosophical, radical and scientific perspectives in its analysis of psychological, psychiatric and psychotherapeutic systems. With a following wind, it will sometimes make you laugh out loud.

 

From Vicarious Trauma to Transformation

I’ve just got back from delivering a 2 day training course with Eleanor Longden on Abuse, Trauma and Dissociation, to 35 mental health professionals in Shrewsbury. I was really struck by people’s willingness and commitment to staying with some really difficult material. We spoke about the importance of having good support and the need to take really good care of ourselves when working directly with trauma, to protect us from the effects of vicarious traumatization.

Vicarious trauma, the process of change that happens because you care about other people who have been hurt, and feel committed or responsible to helping them, can lead to changes in your psychological, physical, and spiritual well-being. When you identify with the pain of people who have endured terrible things, you bring their grief, fear, anger, and despair into your own awareness and experience. Your commitment and sense of responsibility can lead to high expectations and eventually contribute to your feeling burdened, overwhelmed, and perhaps hopeless. Vicarious trauma, like experiencing trauma directly, can deeply impact the way you see the world and your deepest sense of meaning and hope. Vicarious traumatisation is not the responsibility of clients. Organisations that provide trauma-related services bear a responsibility to create policies and work settings that facilitate staff (and therefore client) well-being. Each trauma worker is responsible for self-care, working reflectively and engaging in regular, frequent, trauma-informed supervision. There are many ways of addressing vicarious traumatisation. All involve awareness, balance, and connection.

Beyond vicarious traumatisation lies vicarious transformation. This is the process of transforming one’s vicarious trauma, leading to spiritual growth. Vicarious transformation is a process of active engagement with the negative changes that come about through trauma work. It can be recognized by a deepened sense of connection with all living beings, a broader sense of moral inclusion, a greater appreciation of the gifts in one’s life, and a greater sense of meaning and hope. Vicarious transformation is a process, not an endpoint or outcome. If we can embrace, rather than fending off, other people’s extraordinary pain, our humanity is expanded. In this receptive mode, our caring is deepened. People who have suffered trauma and abuse can feel that we are allowing them to affect us. This reciprocal process conveys respect. We learn from trauma survivors that people can endure horrible things and carry on. This knowledge is a gift we can pass along to others.

Due to popular demand we will be offering further courses this year on Abuse, Trauma and Dissociation in Nottingham, Cork and in London. See events section for further information.

Ritual Abuse

Ritual Abuse

On The Web

End Ritual Abusewww.endritualabuse.org
This site provides articles, resources, and links to information and support.

Extreme Abuse Surveywww.extreme-abuse-survey.net
Results, findings, questionnaires and presentations. More than 750 pages of documentation.

Mind Justicewww.mindjustice.org
An extensive and well-organized site on with articles, source material, and position papers on mind control, torture, and non-lethal weapons

Ritual Abuse, Ritual Crime and Healingwww.ra-info.org
Information for Survivor’s, Therapists and Others.

Ritual Abuse Network Scotlandwww.rans.org.uk
An informative and useful resource for anyone connected with ritual abuse anywhere in the world, be they survivors, counsellors, or just a concerned friend.

Ritual Abuse and Satanic Ritual Abuse Evidence and Journal Articles – http://childabusewiki.org/index.php?title=Satanic_Ritual_Abuse_Evidence_and_Journal_Articles

S.M.A.R.T. (Stop Mind Control and Ritual Abuse Today): www.ritualabuse.us
Many articles, transcripts of speeches, information on up-coming conferences, plus all back issues of the newsletter.

Survivorshipwww.survivorship.org
For survivors of ritual abuse, mind control and torture and their allies.

In Print

Morris, M. (1982). If I Should Die Before I Wake. Black Swan Books.

Noblitt, R. and Perskin Noblitt, P. (2008). Ritual Abuse in the Twenty First Century: Psychological, Forensic, Social and Political Considerations. Robert. D. Reed Publishers.

Ross, C. (1995). Satanic Ritual Abuse: Principals of Treatment. University of Toronto Press.

Ryder, D. (1992). Breaking the Circle of Satanic Ritual Abuse: Recognizing and Recovering from the Hidden Trauma. Compcare Publishers.

Scott, S. (2001). The Politics and Experience of Ritual Abuse: Beyond Belief. Open University Press.

Sinason, V. (1994). Treating Survivors of Satanist Abuse. Routledge.

Smith, M. (1993). Ritual Abuse. What It Is, Why It Happens, How to Help. Harper: San Francisco.

Dissociation

Dissociation

On The Web

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
ISSTD seeks to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation.

Mosaic Mindswww.mosaicminds.org
Online resource centre compiled by survivors of dissociative identify disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder). Includes: ‘keeping safe’, ‘reading room’, ‘interactive community forums’, ‘books’ and links section

PODSwww.pods-online.org.uk

PODS (Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors) works to make recovery from dissociative disorders a reality through:

  • training
  • informing
  • supporting

The Pottergate Centrewww.dissociation.co.uk
The Centre offers a wide range of services to professionals, to clients who may have a dissociative disorder and to the public at large.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders). Includes a comprehensive resource section.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

In Print

Case, J.F. (1991). The Flock: the Autobiography of a Multiple Personality. Abacus.

Castelli, J. (2000). Looking Inside: Life Lessons From a Multiple Personality in Pictures and Words. Castelli Studios Publishing.

Gil, Eliana. (1990). United We Stand: A Book for People with Multiple Personalities. Launch Press.

Mayer, R. (1988). Through Divided Minds: Probing the Mysteries of Multiple Personalities. A Doctors Story. Avon

Mollon, P. (1996). Multiple Selves, Multiple Voices: Working with Trauma, Violation and Dissociation. Wiley.

Moskowitz, A., Schafer, I. & Dorahy, M. (Eds.) (2009). Psychosis, trauma and dissociation: Emerging perspectives on severe psychopathology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rheta Schreiber, F. (1973). Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities. Penguin Books.

Ross, C. (1994). The Osiris Complex: Case-Studies in Multiple Personality. University of Toronto Press.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge.

Stout, M. (2001). The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness – Tales of Multiple Personality in Everyday Life.

Abuse, Trauma, Healing & Recovery

Abuse, Trauma, Healing & Recovery

On The Web

Alice Millerwww.alice-miller.com
Website of pioneering psychotherapist Alice Miller

Recovered Memory projecthttp://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/about/
Case Archives, Commentary, and Scholarly Resources

David Baldwin’s Trauma Information Pageswww.trauma-pages.com
Providing information for clinicians and researchers in the traumatic-stress field

The European Society for Trauma and Dissociationwww.estd.org
Promoting an increase in the knowledge of Trauma, Dissociation and all disorders related to chronic traumatisation.

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
Seeking to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation

Jim Hopper’s Information Pageswww.jimhopper.com
Providing scholarly knowledge and resources, in language and formats accessible to any interested and motivated person – young or old, highly educated or not.

The Lantern Projectwww.lanternproject.org.uk
Formerly known as “Victims No Longer”, the Lantern Project offers a website supporting victims of childhood sexual abuse, domestic violence, racial abuse and bullying.

Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torturewww.torturecare.org.uk
A charity that is dedicated soley to the treatment of torture survivors, including: advocacy, counselling & physical therapies.

One in Four UKwww.oneinfour.org.uk
One in Four offers a voice to and support for people who have experienced sexual abuse and sexual violence.

Rape Crisis (England and Wales)www.rapecrisis.org.uk
Provides co-ordination and support to affiliated member groups and campaigns and lobbies to raise awareness of the issues of sexual violence in the wider community and with local, regional and national government.

The Recovery Practice  – http://www.therecoverypractice.org.uk/

The Recovery Practice aims to help make mental health and well being possible for all people and to contribute to the understanding of mental health problems. Julian Turner has had over twenty years counselling practice and has worked extensively with people who have experienced emotional distress. He works in the Leeds area.

Respondwww.respond.org.uk
Works with children and adults with learning disabilities who have experienced abuse or trauma, as well as those who have abused others, through psychotherapy, advocacy, campaigning and other support.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders).

Support Linewww.supportline.org.uk/problems/child_abuse_survivors.php
Provides guidance and resources for adult survivors of childhood abuse.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

Trauma and Abuse Support Centrewww.tasc-online.org.uk
Provides a UK web-based resource for survivors of the whole spectrum of child sexual abuse (including extreme and ritual abuse) and for anyone involved in supporting them.

Women’s Aidwww.womensaid.org.uk
A national charity working to support women and children affected by domestic violence. Site includes finding help locally and a survivors handbook.

Bass, E. and Davis, L. (1988). The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse. Cedar Press.

Bloom, S. (1997). Creating Sanctuary: Towards the Evolution of Safe Communities. London: Routledge.

Blume, S. (1990). Secret Survivors: Uncovering Incest and its After-effects in Women. John Wiley and Sons.

Brison, S.J. (2002). Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self. Princeton University Press.

Davis, L. (1991). Allies in Healing: When the Person You Love Was Sexually Abused as a Child. HarperPerennial.

Davoine, F. and Gaudilliere, J-M. (2004). History Beyond Trauma. Other Press LLC.

Dolan, Y. (2000). Beyond Survival: Living Well is the Best Revenge. BT Press: London.

Fraser, S. My Father’s House: A Memoir of Incest and of Healing. Virago Press.

Herman, J. L. (1992). Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books.

Levine, P. (1997). Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma – The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences. New York: North Atlantic Books.

Levine, P. (2008). Healing Trauma: A Pioneering Program for Restoring the Wisdom of Your Body. Boulder, CO: Sounds True Inc.

Mackinnon, M. (1991). Each Small Step: Breaking the Chains of Abuse and Addiction. Gynergy Books.

Maltz, W. (1992). The Sexual Healing Journey: A Guide for Survivors of Sexual Abuse. Qill: HarperCollins Publishers.

Perry, B. (2008). The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog and Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook: What Traumatized Children Can Teach us About Loss, Love and Healing. New York: Basic Books.

Rothschild, B. (2000). The Body Remembers: The psychophysiology of trauma and trauma treatment. London: W. W. Norton & Co.

Rothschild, B. (2010). 8 Keys to Safe Trauma Therapy: Take Charge Strategies to Empower Your Healing. W. W. Norton & Co.

Sebold, A. (2003). Lucky. Picador.

Spring, J. (1987). Cry Hard and Swim: The Story of An Incest Survivor. Virago Press.

Tal, K. (1996). Worlds of Hurt: Reading the Literatures of Trauma. Cambridge University Press.

Venable Raine, N. (2000). After Silence: Rape and My Journey Back. Virago Press Ltd; New edition.

Warner, S. (2000). Understanding Child Sexual Abuse: Making the Tactics Visible. Handsell Publishing.

Conferences

Jacqui giving a presentation

Conferences:

I am an experienced and accomplished public speaker. I have spoken at numerous national and international conferences and events for both statutory and non-government organisations.

I have been a keynote speaker at a variety of events on a diverse range of subjects. My specialist areas of expertise are:

  • Personal experiences of ‘madness’ and recovery
  • Hearing voices and ‘psychosis’
  • Critiquing biomedical approaches to madness and distress
  • Trauma and abuse
  • Ritual abuse
  • Dissociation and multiplicity

Biography

Jacqui Dillon was born and bred in East London where she still lives. She is a respected campaigner, writer, international speaker and trainer specialising in hearing voices, ‘psychosis’, dissociation, trauma, abuse, healing and recovery. Jacqui has worked within mental health services for more than 15 years, in a variety of settings, including community, acute, low, medium and high secure settings, prisons, colleges and universities.

Jacqui is the national Chair of the Hearing Voices Network in England and a key figure in the Hearing Voices Movement internationally. She is Honorary Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of East London, Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health at Durham University and Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Community Mental Health, Birmingham City University.

Along with Professor Marius Romme and Dr Sandra Escher she is the co-editor of Living with Voices, an anthology of 50 voice hearers’ stories of recovery. She is also co-editor of Demedicalising Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition and Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Psychosis (2nd Edition). Jacqui has published numerous articles and papers and is on the editorial board of the journal Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches.

Jacqui’s experiences of surviving childhood abuse and subsequent experiences of using psychiatric services inform her work and she is an outspoken advocate and campaigner for trauma informed approaches to madness and distress. She was nominated for Mind Champion of the Year Award 2009 for her outstanding contribution to increasing understanding of mental health.

Jacqui is proud to be a part of a collective voice demanding a radical shift in the way we make sense of and respond to experiences currently defined as psychiatric illnesses. Alongside her work which she is passionate about, Jacqui enjoys swimming, dancing, laughing and spending time with the people she loves, especially her children.

 

Pages

Trauma & Dissociation Journal

Hearing voices, dissociation, and the self: A functional-analytic perspective

Abstract

In the current article, we review existing models of the etiology of voice hearing. We summarize the argument and evidence that voice hearing is primarily a dissociative process involving critical aspects of self. We propose a complementary perspective on these phenomena that is based on a modern behavioral account of complex behavior known as relational frame theory. This type of approach to voice hearing concerns itself with the functions served for the individual by this voice hearing; the necessary history, such as trauma, that establishes these functions; and the relevant dissociative processes involving self and others. In short, we propose a trauma–dissociation developmental trajectory in which trauma impacts negatively on the development of self through the process of dissociation. Using the relational frame theory concept of relations of perspective taking, our dissociation model purports that trauma gives rise to more coordination than distinction relations between self and others, thus weakening an individual’s sense of a distinct self. Voice hearing experiences, therefore, reflect an individual’s perceptions of self and others and may indicate impairments in the natural psychological boundaries between these critical related concepts. One clinical implication suggested by this model is that therapeutic intervention should understand the behaviors associated with a sense of self that is fragile and threatened by others. Relations with self and others should be a key focus of therapy as well as interventions designed to enhance a coherent distinct sense of self.

Authors: C. McEnteggart , Y.Barnes-Holmes, J. Dillon, J. Egger & J.Oliver

Published in: Journal of Trauma and Dissociation

Publisher: Taylor and Francis

Date: 8th January 2016

Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15299732.2016.1241851?journalCode=wjtd20

Trauma, Dissociation, Attachment & Neuroscience: A new paradigm for understanding severe mental distress

Special Edition: Complex reactions to severe trauma

The paper by Dillon, Johnstone & Longden in this volume (Trauma, Dissociation, Attachment and Neuroscience) brings together evidence from the neuroscience and mental health literature with the hope that this might lead to a paradigm shift in the way that people are seen and helped. Hopefully they are right, and biopsychosocial models worthy of the name may come to dominate practice, rather than models that sometimes masquerade as biopsychosocial but which are basically ‘bio-bio-bio models’, with social and psychological factors reduced to mere events that trigger an underlying genetic illness (Read, Bentall & Fosse, 2009).

JCPCP is a peer-reviewed journal which values personal experience above professional boundaries and doctrinal jargon. It provides a forum for ideas, experience and views of people working in the psychological world and those who use psychotherapy or receive psychiatric services. The journal encourages a critical, reflexive view of psychology and counselling and is a constant challenge to orthodoxy. Our contributors reflect on their work and experiences in therapy, in relationships and in institutions. The journal embraces philosophical, radical and scientific perspectives in its analysis of psychological, psychiatric and psychotherapeutic systems. With a following wind, it will sometimes make you laugh out loud.

 

From Vicarious Trauma to Transformation

I’ve just got back from delivering a 2 day training course with Eleanor Longden on Abuse, Trauma and Dissociation, to 35 mental health professionals in Shrewsbury. I was really struck by people’s willingness and commitment to staying with some really difficult material. We spoke about the importance of having good support and the need to take really good care of ourselves when working directly with trauma, to protect us from the effects of vicarious traumatization.

Vicarious trauma, the process of change that happens because you care about other people who have been hurt, and feel committed or responsible to helping them, can lead to changes in your psychological, physical, and spiritual well-being. When you identify with the pain of people who have endured terrible things, you bring their grief, fear, anger, and despair into your own awareness and experience. Your commitment and sense of responsibility can lead to high expectations and eventually contribute to your feeling burdened, overwhelmed, and perhaps hopeless. Vicarious trauma, like experiencing trauma directly, can deeply impact the way you see the world and your deepest sense of meaning and hope. Vicarious traumatisation is not the responsibility of clients. Organisations that provide trauma-related services bear a responsibility to create policies and work settings that facilitate staff (and therefore client) well-being. Each trauma worker is responsible for self-care, working reflectively and engaging in regular, frequent, trauma-informed supervision. There are many ways of addressing vicarious traumatisation. All involve awareness, balance, and connection.

Beyond vicarious traumatisation lies vicarious transformation. This is the process of transforming one’s vicarious trauma, leading to spiritual growth. Vicarious transformation is a process of active engagement with the negative changes that come about through trauma work. It can be recognized by a deepened sense of connection with all living beings, a broader sense of moral inclusion, a greater appreciation of the gifts in one’s life, and a greater sense of meaning and hope. Vicarious transformation is a process, not an endpoint or outcome. If we can embrace, rather than fending off, other people’s extraordinary pain, our humanity is expanded. In this receptive mode, our caring is deepened. People who have suffered trauma and abuse can feel that we are allowing them to affect us. This reciprocal process conveys respect. We learn from trauma survivors that people can endure horrible things and carry on. This knowledge is a gift we can pass along to others.

Due to popular demand we will be offering further courses this year on Abuse, Trauma and Dissociation in Nottingham, Cork and in London. See events section for further information.

Ritual Abuse

Ritual Abuse

On The Web

End Ritual Abusewww.endritualabuse.org
This site provides articles, resources, and links to information and support.

Extreme Abuse Surveywww.extreme-abuse-survey.net
Results, findings, questionnaires and presentations. More than 750 pages of documentation.

Mind Justicewww.mindjustice.org
An extensive and well-organized site on with articles, source material, and position papers on mind control, torture, and non-lethal weapons

Ritual Abuse, Ritual Crime and Healingwww.ra-info.org
Information for Survivor’s, Therapists and Others.

Ritual Abuse Network Scotlandwww.rans.org.uk
An informative and useful resource for anyone connected with ritual abuse anywhere in the world, be they survivors, counsellors, or just a concerned friend.

Ritual Abuse and Satanic Ritual Abuse Evidence and Journal Articles – http://childabusewiki.org/index.php?title=Satanic_Ritual_Abuse_Evidence_and_Journal_Articles

S.M.A.R.T. (Stop Mind Control and Ritual Abuse Today): www.ritualabuse.us
Many articles, transcripts of speeches, information on up-coming conferences, plus all back issues of the newsletter.

Survivorshipwww.survivorship.org
For survivors of ritual abuse, mind control and torture and their allies.

In Print

Morris, M. (1982). If I Should Die Before I Wake. Black Swan Books.

Noblitt, R. and Perskin Noblitt, P. (2008). Ritual Abuse in the Twenty First Century: Psychological, Forensic, Social and Political Considerations. Robert. D. Reed Publishers.

Ross, C. (1995). Satanic Ritual Abuse: Principals of Treatment. University of Toronto Press.

Ryder, D. (1992). Breaking the Circle of Satanic Ritual Abuse: Recognizing and Recovering from the Hidden Trauma. Compcare Publishers.

Scott, S. (2001). The Politics and Experience of Ritual Abuse: Beyond Belief. Open University Press.

Sinason, V. (1994). Treating Survivors of Satanist Abuse. Routledge.

Smith, M. (1993). Ritual Abuse. What It Is, Why It Happens, How to Help. Harper: San Francisco.

Dissociation

Dissociation

On The Web

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
ISSTD seeks to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation.

Mosaic Mindswww.mosaicminds.org
Online resource centre compiled by survivors of dissociative identify disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder). Includes: ‘keeping safe’, ‘reading room’, ‘interactive community forums’, ‘books’ and links section

PODSwww.pods-online.org.uk

PODS (Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors) works to make recovery from dissociative disorders a reality through:

  • training
  • informing
  • supporting

The Pottergate Centrewww.dissociation.co.uk
The Centre offers a wide range of services to professionals, to clients who may have a dissociative disorder and to the public at large.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders). Includes a comprehensive resource section.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

In Print

Case, J.F. (1991). The Flock: the Autobiography of a Multiple Personality. Abacus.

Castelli, J. (2000). Looking Inside: Life Lessons From a Multiple Personality in Pictures and Words. Castelli Studios Publishing.

Gil, Eliana. (1990). United We Stand: A Book for People with Multiple Personalities. Launch Press.

Mayer, R. (1988). Through Divided Minds: Probing the Mysteries of Multiple Personalities. A Doctors Story. Avon

Mollon, P. (1996). Multiple Selves, Multiple Voices: Working with Trauma, Violation and Dissociation. Wiley.

Moskowitz, A., Schafer, I. & Dorahy, M. (Eds.) (2009). Psychosis, trauma and dissociation: Emerging perspectives on severe psychopathology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rheta Schreiber, F. (1973). Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities. Penguin Books.

Ross, C. (1994). The Osiris Complex: Case-Studies in Multiple Personality. University of Toronto Press.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge.

Stout, M. (2001). The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness – Tales of Multiple Personality in Everyday Life.

Abuse, Trauma, Healing & Recovery

Abuse, Trauma, Healing & Recovery

On The Web

Alice Millerwww.alice-miller.com
Website of pioneering psychotherapist Alice Miller

Recovered Memory projecthttp://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/about/
Case Archives, Commentary, and Scholarly Resources

David Baldwin’s Trauma Information Pageswww.trauma-pages.com
Providing information for clinicians and researchers in the traumatic-stress field

The European Society for Trauma and Dissociationwww.estd.org
Promoting an increase in the knowledge of Trauma, Dissociation and all disorders related to chronic traumatisation.

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
Seeking to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation

Jim Hopper’s Information Pageswww.jimhopper.com
Providing scholarly knowledge and resources, in language and formats accessible to any interested and motivated person – young or old, highly educated or not.

The Lantern Projectwww.lanternproject.org.uk
Formerly known as “Victims No Longer”, the Lantern Project offers a website supporting victims of childhood sexual abuse, domestic violence, racial abuse and bullying.

Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torturewww.torturecare.org.uk
A charity that is dedicated soley to the treatment of torture survivors, including: advocacy, counselling & physical therapies.

One in Four UKwww.oneinfour.org.uk
One in Four offers a voice to and support for people who have experienced sexual abuse and sexual violence.

Rape Crisis (England and Wales)www.rapecrisis.org.uk
Provides co-ordination and support to affiliated member groups and campaigns and lobbies to raise awareness of the issues of sexual violence in the wider community and with local, regional and national government.

The Recovery Practice  – http://www.therecoverypractice.org.uk/

The Recovery Practice aims to help make mental health and well being possible for all people and to contribute to the understanding of mental health problems. Julian Turner has had over twenty years counselling practice and has worked extensively with people who have experienced emotional distress. He works in the Leeds area.

Respondwww.respond.org.uk
Works with children and adults with learning disabilities who have experienced abuse or trauma, as well as those who have abused others, through psychotherapy, advocacy, campaigning and other support.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders).

Support Linewww.supportline.org.uk/problems/child_abuse_survivors.php
Provides guidance and resources for adult survivors of childhood abuse.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

Trauma and Abuse Support Centrewww.tasc-online.org.uk
Provides a UK web-based resource for survivors of the whole spectrum of child sexual abuse (including extreme and ritual abuse) and for anyone involved in supporting them.

Women’s Aidwww.womensaid.org.uk
A national charity working to support women and children affected by domestic violence. Site includes finding help locally and a survivors handbook.

Bass, E. and Davis, L. (1988). The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse. Cedar Press.

Bloom, S. (1997). Creating Sanctuary: Towards the Evolution of Safe Communities. London: Routledge.

Blume, S. (1990). Secret Survivors: Uncovering Incest and its After-effects in Women. John Wiley and Sons.

Brison, S.J. (2002). Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self. Princeton University Press.

Davis, L. (1991). Allies in Healing: When the Person You Love Was Sexually Abused as a Child. HarperPerennial.

Davoine, F. and Gaudilliere, J-M. (2004). History Beyond Trauma. Other Press LLC.

Dolan, Y. (2000). Beyond Survival: Living Well is the Best Revenge. BT Press: London.

Fraser, S. My Father’s House: A Memoir of Incest and of Healing. Virago Press.

Herman, J. L. (1992). Trauma and Recovery. New York: Basic Books.

Levine, P. (1997). Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma – The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences. New York: North Atlantic Books.

Levine, P. (2008). Healing Trauma: A Pioneering Program for Restoring the Wisdom of Your Body. Boulder, CO: Sounds True Inc.

Mackinnon, M. (1991). Each Small Step: Breaking the Chains of Abuse and Addiction. Gynergy Books.

Maltz, W. (1992). The Sexual Healing Journey: A Guide for Survivors of Sexual Abuse. Qill: HarperCollins Publishers.

Perry, B. (2008). The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog and Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook: What Traumatized Children Can Teach us About Loss, Love and Healing. New York: Basic Books.

Rothschild, B. (2000). The Body Remembers: The psychophysiology of trauma and trauma treatment. London: W. W. Norton & Co.

Rothschild, B. (2010). 8 Keys to Safe Trauma Therapy: Take Charge Strategies to Empower Your Healing. W. W. Norton & Co.

Sebold, A. (2003). Lucky. Picador.

Spring, J. (1987). Cry Hard and Swim: The Story of An Incest Survivor. Virago Press.

Tal, K. (1996). Worlds of Hurt: Reading the Literatures of Trauma. Cambridge University Press.

Venable Raine, N. (2000). After Silence: Rape and My Journey Back. Virago Press Ltd; New edition.

Warner, S. (2000). Understanding Child Sexual Abuse: Making the Tactics Visible. Handsell Publishing.

Conferences

Jacqui giving a presentation

Conferences:

I am an experienced and accomplished public speaker. I have spoken at numerous national and international conferences and events for both statutory and non-government organisations.

I have been a keynote speaker at a variety of events on a diverse range of subjects. My specialist areas of expertise are:

  • Personal experiences of ‘madness’ and recovery
  • Hearing voices and ‘psychosis’
  • Critiquing biomedical approaches to madness and distress
  • Trauma and abuse
  • Ritual abuse
  • Dissociation and multiplicity

Biography

Jacqui Dillon was born and bred in East London where she still lives. She is a respected campaigner, writer, international speaker and trainer specialising in hearing voices, ‘psychosis’, dissociation, trauma, abuse, healing and recovery. Jacqui has worked within mental health services for more than 15 years, in a variety of settings, including community, acute, low, medium and high secure settings, prisons, colleges and universities.

Jacqui is the national Chair of the Hearing Voices Network in England and a key figure in the Hearing Voices Movement internationally. She is Honorary Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of East London, Honorary Research Fellow in the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health at Durham University and Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Community Mental Health, Birmingham City University.

Along with Professor Marius Romme and Dr Sandra Escher she is the co-editor of Living with Voices, an anthology of 50 voice hearers’ stories of recovery. She is also co-editor of Demedicalising Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition and Models of Madness: Psychological, Social and Biological Approaches to Psychosis (2nd Edition). Jacqui has published numerous articles and papers and is on the editorial board of the journal Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches.

Jacqui’s experiences of surviving childhood abuse and subsequent experiences of using psychiatric services inform her work and she is an outspoken advocate and campaigner for trauma informed approaches to madness and distress. She was nominated for Mind Champion of the Year Award 2009 for her outstanding contribution to increasing understanding of mental health.

Jacqui is proud to be a part of a collective voice demanding a radical shift in the way we make sense of and respond to experiences currently defined as psychiatric illnesses. Alongside her work which she is passionate about, Jacqui enjoys swimming, dancing, laughing and spending time with the people she loves, especially her children.