Posts

Dissociation

Dissociation

On The Web

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
ISSTD seeks to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation.

Mosaic Mindswww.mosaicminds.org
Online resource centre compiled by survivors of dissociative identify disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder). Includes: ‘keeping safe’, ‘reading room’, ‘interactive community forums’, ‘books’ and links section

PODSwww.pods-online.org.uk

PODS (Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors) works to make recovery from dissociative disorders a reality through:

  • training
  • informing
  • supporting

The Pottergate Centrewww.dissociation.co.uk
The Centre offers a wide range of services to professionals, to clients who may have a dissociative disorder and to the public at large.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders). Includes a comprehensive resource section.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

In Print

Case, J.F. (1991). The Flock: the Autobiography of a Multiple Personality. Abacus.

Castelli, J. (2000). Looking Inside: Life Lessons From a Multiple Personality in Pictures and Words. Castelli Studios Publishing.

Gil, Eliana. (1990). United We Stand: A Book for People with Multiple Personalities. Launch Press.

Mayer, R. (1988). Through Divided Minds: Probing the Mysteries of Multiple Personalities. A Doctors Story. Avon

Mollon, P. (1996). Multiple Selves, Multiple Voices: Working with Trauma, Violation and Dissociation. Wiley.

Moskowitz, A., Schafer, I. & Dorahy, M. (Eds.) (2009). Psychosis, trauma and dissociation: Emerging perspectives on severe psychopathology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rheta Schreiber, F. (1973). Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities. Penguin Books.

Ross, C. (1994). The Osiris Complex: Case-Studies in Multiple Personality. University of Toronto Press.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge.

Stout, M. (2001). The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness – Tales of Multiple Personality in Everyday Life.

Attachment

Attachment & Child Development

On The Web

The Bowlby Centre – www.thebowlbycentre.org.uk
An organisation committed to the development, promotion and practice of attachment-based and relational psychotherapy.

In Print

Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysishttp://www.karnacbooks.com/JournalDetail.asp?ID=5
A new leading edge journal for clinicians working relationally with their clients; it is a professional journal, not an academic journal, featuring cultural articles, politics, reviews and poetry relevant to attachment and relational issues; an inclusive journal welcoming contributions from clinicians of all orientations seeking to make a contribution to attachment approaches to clinical work.

Axline, V. (new edition 1990). Dibs in Search of Self: Personality Development in Play Therapy. Penguin.

Benamer, S. (2010). Telling Stories? Attachment-Based Approaches to the Treatment of Psychosis. Karnac.

Bowlby, J. (1999). Attachment. Attachment and Loss (vol. 1) (2nd ed.). New York: Basic Books.

Bowlby, J. (1973). Separation: Anxiety & Anger. Attachment and Loss (vol. 2); (International psycho-analytical library no.95). London: Hogarth Press.

Bowlby, J. (1980). Loss: Sadness & Depression. Attachment and Loss (vol. 3); (International psycho-analytical library no.109). London: Hogarth Press.

Bowlby, J. (1988). A Secure Base: Parent-Child Attachment and Healthy Human Development. Tavistock professional book. London: Routledge.

Bowlby, J. (new edition 2005). The Making & Breaking of Affectional Bonds. Routledge Classics.

Gerhardt, S. (2004). Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby’s Brain. Routledge.

Stern, D. (1992). Diary of a Baby: What Your Child Sees, Feels, and Experiences. Basic Books; New edition.

Stern, D. (2000).The Interpersonal World of the Infant: A View from Psychoanalysis and Development Psychology. Basic Books.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge

Winnicott, D.W. (1965). The Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment: Studies in the Theory of the Emotional Development, London, Hogarth Press.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 2000). The Child, the Family, and the Outside World. Penguin.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 2006). The Family and Individual Development. Routledge Classics.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 1991). The Piggle: An Account of the Psychoanalytic Treatment of a Little Girl. Penguin.

Winnicott. D.W. and Winnicott, C. (new edition 1990). Home is Where We Start from: Essays by a Psychoanalyst. Penguin.

The Tale of An Ordinary Little Girl

Psychosis Journal CoverThe Tale of an Ordinary Little Girl won the 2010 Award for Best Paper in the Second Volume of Psychosis (Category B: Experienced-based articles).

Hearing voices, self-harm, eating “disorders” and dissociation, when viewed objectively, are frequently classified as symptoms of serious mental illnesses and disordered personalities that require treatment, eradication and cure.

This convenient societal solution to the complex problem of endemic childhood abuse requires that victims of abuse endure further insult to injury and become the problem to be dealt with.

By tracing the roots of so-called “symptoms” back to their origins in traumatic childhood events and having the courage to bear witness to painful truths, a more accurate, humane and respectful picture emerges which reframes “symptoms” as essential survival techniques.

The mark of a responsible society and responsive services is the willingness to share collective responsibility for these experiences, to honour them, support them and learn from them at all levels.

Pages

Dissociation

Dissociation

On The Web

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociationwww.isst-d.org
ISSTD seeks to advance clinical, scientific, and societal understanding about the prevalence and consequences of chronic trauma and dissociation.

Mosaic Mindswww.mosaicminds.org
Online resource centre compiled by survivors of dissociative identify disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder). Includes: ‘keeping safe’, ‘reading room’, ‘interactive community forums’, ‘books’ and links section

PODSwww.pods-online.org.uk

PODS (Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors) works to make recovery from dissociative disorders a reality through:

  • training
  • informing
  • supporting

The Pottergate Centrewww.dissociation.co.uk
The Centre offers a wide range of services to professionals, to clients who may have a dissociative disorder and to the public at large.

Sidran Traumatic Stress Institutewww.sidran.org
International not for profit organisation aimed at supporting people to recovery form the effects of trauma (including dissociative disorders). Includes a comprehensive resource section.

Trauma and Abuse Groupwww.tag-uk.net
TAG promotes education and raises awareness in the field of dissociation, attachment, trauma and abuse recovery.

In Print

Case, J.F. (1991). The Flock: the Autobiography of a Multiple Personality. Abacus.

Castelli, J. (2000). Looking Inside: Life Lessons From a Multiple Personality in Pictures and Words. Castelli Studios Publishing.

Gil, Eliana. (1990). United We Stand: A Book for People with Multiple Personalities. Launch Press.

Mayer, R. (1988). Through Divided Minds: Probing the Mysteries of Multiple Personalities. A Doctors Story. Avon

Mollon, P. (1996). Multiple Selves, Multiple Voices: Working with Trauma, Violation and Dissociation. Wiley.

Moskowitz, A., Schafer, I. & Dorahy, M. (Eds.) (2009). Psychosis, trauma and dissociation: Emerging perspectives on severe psychopathology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Rheta Schreiber, F. (1973). Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities. Penguin Books.

Ross, C. (1994). The Osiris Complex: Case-Studies in Multiple Personality. University of Toronto Press.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge.

Stout, M. (2001). The Myth of Sanity: Divided Consciousness and the Promise of Awareness – Tales of Multiple Personality in Everyday Life.

Attachment

Attachment & Child Development

On The Web

The Bowlby Centre – www.thebowlbycentre.org.uk
An organisation committed to the development, promotion and practice of attachment-based and relational psychotherapy.

In Print

Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysishttp://www.karnacbooks.com/JournalDetail.asp?ID=5
A new leading edge journal for clinicians working relationally with their clients; it is a professional journal, not an academic journal, featuring cultural articles, politics, reviews and poetry relevant to attachment and relational issues; an inclusive journal welcoming contributions from clinicians of all orientations seeking to make a contribution to attachment approaches to clinical work.

Axline, V. (new edition 1990). Dibs in Search of Self: Personality Development in Play Therapy. Penguin.

Benamer, S. (2010). Telling Stories? Attachment-Based Approaches to the Treatment of Psychosis. Karnac.

Bowlby, J. (1999). Attachment. Attachment and Loss (vol. 1) (2nd ed.). New York: Basic Books.

Bowlby, J. (1973). Separation: Anxiety & Anger. Attachment and Loss (vol. 2); (International psycho-analytical library no.95). London: Hogarth Press.

Bowlby, J. (1980). Loss: Sadness & Depression. Attachment and Loss (vol. 3); (International psycho-analytical library no.109). London: Hogarth Press.

Bowlby, J. (1988). A Secure Base: Parent-Child Attachment and Healthy Human Development. Tavistock professional book. London: Routledge.

Bowlby, J. (new edition 2005). The Making & Breaking of Affectional Bonds. Routledge Classics.

Gerhardt, S. (2004). Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby’s Brain. Routledge.

Stern, D. (1992). Diary of a Baby: What Your Child Sees, Feels, and Experiences. Basic Books; New edition.

Stern, D. (2000).The Interpersonal World of the Infant: A View from Psychoanalysis and Development Psychology. Basic Books.

Sinason, V. (2002). Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Brunner-Routledge

Winnicott, D.W. (1965). The Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment: Studies in the Theory of the Emotional Development, London, Hogarth Press.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 2000). The Child, the Family, and the Outside World. Penguin.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 2006). The Family and Individual Development. Routledge Classics.

Winnicott. D.W. (new edition 1991). The Piggle: An Account of the Psychoanalytic Treatment of a Little Girl. Penguin.

Winnicott. D.W. and Winnicott, C. (new edition 1990). Home is Where We Start from: Essays by a Psychoanalyst. Penguin.

The Tale of An Ordinary Little Girl

Psychosis Journal CoverThe Tale of an Ordinary Little Girl won the 2010 Award for Best Paper in the Second Volume of Psychosis (Category B: Experienced-based articles).

Hearing voices, self-harm, eating “disorders” and dissociation, when viewed objectively, are frequently classified as symptoms of serious mental illnesses and disordered personalities that require treatment, eradication and cure.

This convenient societal solution to the complex problem of endemic childhood abuse requires that victims of abuse endure further insult to injury and become the problem to be dealt with.

By tracing the roots of so-called “symptoms” back to their origins in traumatic childhood events and having the courage to bear witness to painful truths, a more accurate, humane and respectful picture emerges which reframes “symptoms” as essential survival techniques.

The mark of a responsible society and responsive services is the willingness to share collective responsibility for these experiences, to honour them, support them and learn from them at all levels.